We are blogging librarians, teachers, parents, illustrators, authors, and literacy passionistas. Share a Story - Shape a Future
is a collaborative venue to share ideas and celebrate everything reading has to offer our kids.

Tuesday, March 13, 2012

Share a Story 2012: A Quick Look Back

We had several notes over the weekend from folks who were "just now" catching up on Share a Story - Shape a Future 2012 and reading the posts. We hope you're still basking in all that great, positive energy!!

We also had a couple of other items and additions that I wanted to highlight. I'll be adding them to our Comprehensive Index of Posts and List of Contributors, but I also want to share them here.

Debbie Alvarez, who blogs at The Styling Librarian has a three-part series called International Mindedness. These are postsshare "various books [that] also cultivate deep discussion to develop International Mindedness. In addition to the book content, Debbie has links to websites and other "World Awareness Resources" on the Web.



I also wanted to share a note from Josh Ory at Reading Racehorse, LLC. There were more than 900 downloads of Frank the Friendly Pirate, the company's eBook App which they made available for free during Share a Story. We hope you'll stay in touch with Reading Racehorse, as more titles will be released this year and available in the iTunes store. [for iPhone, iPad, or iPod Touch]


Our thanks to everyone who made Share a Story - Shape a Future 2012 a wonderful, energizing event. If you are interested in being part of next year's planning group, just drop us a line! Work will begin this fall.

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Friday, March 9, 2012

Writing @ Reading - We Have a Winner

Congratulations to Maria @ Once Upon a Story for winning the 2012 Multicultural Books Collection of 45 (!) children's literature celebrating cultures around the world. The books, donated by Reading is Fundamental, will be sent to a school library or public library in your community!



As advertised, we selected the winner at random. Here's what I did ...

1. I numbered each post written in response to a Writing @ Reading prompt. We had five posts, so we had numbers 1 to 5, working backward from the most recent post (Wednesday).

1. Maria @ Once Upon a Story
2. Maria @ Once Upon a Story
3. Eric VanRaepenbusch @ Happy Birthday Author
4. Christine of Book Life Style
5. Eric VanRaepenbusch @ Happy Birthday Author

2. I went to the Dice Roller on Random.org  Since we had less than 6 entries, I used just one cube.

3. I Rolled the dice. 

Roll 1 - a 6 @ 2012-03 17:59:43 UTC
Rolle 2 - a 2 2012-03-09 18:00:04 UTC

The entry listed as #2 is Maria's!

Congratulations Maria ... Please contact me at shareastory [at] thereadingtub.com to get details about how to have the books sent to the school or public library of your choice.

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Share a Story 2012: Dear Reader Edition

Updated to fix mis-directed links!

Is it Friday already? In just four days we've gotten a year's worth of ideas, suggestions, and hopefully encouragement for not only connecting kids with books, but using them as a launching pad to bigger and broader things.

As we wrap up this week, we thought we would do something a bit different this year. There is no "formal agenda." We have no scheduled guests. Instead, we are opening the floor (as it were) for
  •  culture-of-reading topics we may not have explored, 
  • requests for ideas in specific areas; 
  • questions for our hosts and guests; 
  • your culture-of-reading and literacy ideas; or 
  • just general commentary.
If you've not been able to join us all week, we have an Event Summary page with all of the posts and all of the Writing @ Reading contributions.We hope you find that an easy way to jump in.

We'll be back later this morning to announce the winner of the the 2012 Multicultural Books Collection, for your school or public library. Our friends at Reading Racehorse will continue to offer Frank the Friendly Pirate, an eBook App for free today.


As always, we thank you for joining us on our annual literacy blog tour! We appreciate you spending your time with us ... and for dedicating your passion to creating a community of readers among the kids who touch your lives.

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Thursday, March 8, 2012

Share a Story 2012: Writing @ Reading - Day 4

This is it ... your last chance to submit your entry for our Writing @ Reading contest. Noon, Pacific time! It's a win-win ...

  • You share a personal passion for literacy and reading.
  • You win a set of RIF's 2012 Multicultural Children's Book set for your local school or public library.

Today's theme is bigger than the book. We're rounding out our discussions beyond the printed word and look at the culture of literacy with the ideas of non-book ideas, social reading, and modern formats.

  • How do you find new books to add to your to-be-read (TBR) list? (e.g., Goodreads, Twitter, Book clubs, Friends, browsing the library shelves)
  • What unique / beyond the usual things do you have in your literacy tool belt to engage young readers?
  •  Do you have three examples you can add to our Yes! You are a reader list?
Entries
1. Where do we find our new books? by Eric VonRaepenbush [note: posted too late to be entered in the giveaway]

Our goal with the questions is to reach new places for sharing our reading and literacy experiences and ideas, and we'd love to include your voice, too. Here's how it works ...

1. Select the question(s) that resonates with you.
2. Find an old post or write a new one that answers the question. [Be sure to grab a Share a Story button from the sidebar to include in your new post!]
3. Add your post as a comment.
4. (optional) Tweet about your post and include @ShareaStory or the #SAS-12 hashtag.

We'll be adding links for the questions all week, so there's no rush to have an answer the same day a question is posted ... unless you are entering the contest to receive the RIF 2012 Multicultural Books Collection for your school or public library.

All entries must be posted by Noon Eastern Standard Time, Thursday, 8 March 2012 to be entered in our random drawing. Winners announced Friday, 9 March 2012.

[image credit: Share a Story Logo created by author/illustrator Elizabeth Dulemba.]

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Literacy: Beyond the Ink-Printed Word

One of the mini-themes today is the idea that being a reader transcends "formats." Kids will never get inky fingers reading the newspaper any more, but we hope that they always have the joy of holding and exploring a book.

That said, we also recognize the value and unique opportunities that eBooks and Apps can give our kids. They might just get us over the hump and send reading rates soaring ... at least we can hope so.

Well, that is the idea that Josh Ory and his team (self-described limestone miners!) used as the foundation in creating Reading Racehorse and launching their first eBook app in December 2011.
Even though we are a 'for profit' company, our goal is to teach the world to read. So, in my opinion, it would be selfish of us to not do this. Our concern is for the kids.

What is "this" you ask? Well, it is big. I mean B.I.G. BIG.

For the next 48 hours, Reading Racehorse is giving away Frank the Friendly Pirate, an eBook App available in the iTunes store. [for iPhone, iPad, or iPod Touch]  From the iTunes store description:
The defining function of the app is when a word in the story is touched, the pronunciation of that word is heard through the speaker on the device. There are other apps that continuously read stories in their entirety, but we have taken this a crucial step further.
Our app allows the child to read the words they already know. Then when they come to a word that gives them difficulty, he or she can touch that particular word to hear what it is. The reason this works is the natural tendency to take the easiest path. They will simply read the words they already know and only use the touch function on the ones they don't. Eventually the child will be able to read the entire story without touching any words.

No special code, no secret password, just a free download. We are very grateful to Reading Racehorse for this most generous donation and all that it means for connecting kids with books. While you're in the iTunes store, we would love it if you'd thank Josh, too!

Reading Racehorse will be releasing additional titles in 2012, so stay tuned.

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Readers Take Heart: Yes, You Are a Reader

You don’t think you're a reader?

Well then, grab a cup of joe, sit back, enjoy, and let me offer five ways that you are a model reader for your kids. Not just sometimes, but every day.

Feel free to add yours in the comments … can we get this list to 25?

Target Row
#5. You were thumbing through the Sunday sales pages and shouted “THAT’S what I want … and it’s on sale!”
Your teenager turned around and asked you what you’re talking about, so you showed them a picture of that must-have item … and pointed out the regular and sale prices.


Piled Under
#4. If one more envelope lasts on that pile of mail it is going to land on the floor. Fun or not, you’ve got to open those bills.
As you’re reading, the kids breeze in and out of the kitchen … constantly interrupting your effort with “watcha doin’ mom? can I have a snack?”

They spotted you reading!

Apple iPhone 3GS, Motorola Milestone and LG GW60
#3. You’re standing in line at the DMV, waiting your turn, kids in tow. To help pass the time, you decide to pull out the smart phone and check your email.
When you start laughing at the joke Aunt Mae sent you, the kids see what you’re doing, give you "the look," and whisper “ssshhh mom, you’re embarrassing us.” If you've got the younger ones in tow, they'll be staring up at you asking for something .... all the while spotting you reading.

inside H&H Restaurant
#2. It’s been a long week. No pots, pans, or dinner dishes for you … it’s time for some family dining out.
The eight-year-old is self conscious doesn’t want to order from the “baby menu,” but she gets stuck on some of the words on the ‘big menu.’ So you walk through the items together and read the descriptions for the pictures she points to.

English: Otsu interchange exit sign 日本語: 大津インタ...

#1. You are traveling with your kids and after a short outburst, you hear ...“What’s wrong, Mom?” from the backseat.

So you’re left to explain that you were going to Paradise, and even though it was written in big, bold letters, you missed the exit.

So what do you think?

Being a reader doesn’t mean you are - or have to be - a bookworm.  Readers are who we are ... its something that we do without thinking about it (like breathing, for example).

So congratulations! Stand up and shout! Celebrate the reader you are. Here are more ways to celebrate as we work toward 25 examples ... heck let's make this 26, one for each letter of the alphabet.

A. From Maria @ Once Upon a Story: You're a master in the kitchen. You can follow any recipe and produce a delight straight from Julia Child's kitchen.

B. From Eric VanRaepenbusch @ Happy Birthday Author: You buy a new board game as a gift for one of your children and they immediately want to play. You say, "Hold on, let me READ the instructions."

C. From Eric VanRaepenbusch @ Happy Birthday Author: Your kids get an online code for a new website and together you work through all the steps of the registration form to get them eligible to play.

D. From Eric VanRaepenbusch @ Happy Birthday Author: Unpacking your child's book bag you find the school newsletter and together you talk about all the upcoming events.






Image credits: Wikipedia - Exit Sign; Wikipedia - Restaurant; Piled Under, cogdogblog; Target Row, Diamondduste; Wikipedia - Smart Phones
Enhanced by Zemanta

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Reading Cultures: Transcending Time, Shape & Format

Reading isn't just about books ... we recognize what a word looks like in print long after we speak it. Your toddler could shout "no" with aplumb well before he recognized 'n' and 'o.'

With that idea in mind, today we're going to cast the net a little wider and look at the culture of literacy ... Terry will expand a little bit more on recognizing the reader within, and other guests here will talk about some of the other ways we become readers.

Later this morning we'll have a special surprise that also speaks to today's theme: Literacy beyond the printed word. Let us just say keep that iPhone / iPod Touch  / iPad nearby.

Readers Take Heart by Terry Doherty @ Share a Story
Not sure you're a reader? Then you'll want to read this. Terry offers five examples from everyday life that might help you see that not only are you a reader, you are a MODEL reader! She's hoping that you can add a few examples of your own. Think we can get to 25? Continue reading ...

Updated: Terry is hoping we can get to 26 ... one idea for each letter of the alphabet! What's yours?

MyLMNOP - My Process.  My Journey. by Pam Courtney @ My LMNOP Reads to Kids
I’ve always loved words.  My earliest memory of this relationship can be traced back to a specific summer day.  In rural Louisiana, the front porch was the hub of family activity.  We would gather round my mother’s feet while she read from the  Natchitoches Times. “Yall, listen to this word, Antidisestablishmentarianism. Honestly, I think we (including my mom) repeated that word the entire summer.

Kids at the LIbrary: Scavenger Hunts, Gear, Routines & More by Melissa Taylor @ Imagination Soup
Today’s libraries aren’t just filled with books, they’re filled with technology, community events, media, digital books, and study spaces. As an institution, the library is transforming for the needs of our 21st century children. Enjoy the benefits of the library with your children and watch as they become passionate book aficionados. Continue reading ...

Reaching a Reader: How it All Began by Sarah Jamila Stevenson @ Family Bookshelf
On a fundamental level, the appeal of reading—the love of books—is something that transcends format and aims straight for the heart of the human love for story. When I see book lovers doing their utmost to improve young readers' access to the stories that might change their lives (or at least brighten their day), it is really awe-inspiring. Continue reading ...

A Share a Story Classic: Literacy My Way by Susan Stephenson of the Book Chook
When it comes to exploring literacy beyond the printed word, there is no powerhouse more passionate than the Book Chook. In our second year, Susan Stephenson hosted a day  not unlike today. The theme was creative literacy, and Susan and her guests covered all aspects of literacy in a timeless, invaluable way. Continue reading ... 

Jumping off the page with Social Reading by Sarah Mulhern @ The Reading Zone
This is a reprise of a post Sarah did for Share a Story 2010. If you take a look at the list of books my students last year thought shouldn’t be missed, you’ll see many books that might not be familiar at first glance. But they are familiar to my students. More than familiar. Each of those books was introduced to the class either by my booktalk, a personal recommendation to a particular student, or when a student found it in the library.  However, the power of recommendations from fellow students was what made  each book a “must read” for the rest of my classes. Continue reading ...

Avoiding Terrible Books by Amy Broadmoore @ Delightful Children's Books
I cannot commiserate with you about how rough it is to read to kids. As my husband recently noted, “Reading hypnotizes our kids. It turns them from savage beasts to civilized creatures.” That said, I am in total agreement with Magary that book time becomes intolerable when spent reading terrible children’s books, and it is critically important for us as parents to maintain our sanity while reading books to our kids.
Continue reading ...

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Wednesday, March 7, 2012

Share a Story 2012: Writing @ Reading - Day 3

Wow, we're already at the half-way point! So did you travel 'round the globe with Carol yesterday? Part of our goal for creating a culture of reading is to encourage readers to stretch ... reading widely or reading diversely is more than just a way to expand your reading. It helps you engage in the world around you with more compassion and understanding ... and the world needs a little more of that!

Today Terry Doherty is hosting the topic "Recognizing Readers" at Family Bookshelf. There is a perennial stereotype of what a reader "looks like," and like all stereotypes, it particularly representative of who readers are. Terry and her guests hope to break down that stereotype, and today's writing prompts give you a chance to do the same.

With our focus today on reading as a passport to other worlds, we have selected prompts that help all of us "read widely."

  • Is there a young reader (or reader to be) in your life? Write them a letter expressing what you hope for them as readers.
  • Did you discover that you had a reader but didn't know it? Share your story.
  • What do you think are the most exciting things / changes for today's readers? Will we read more or less? What will we read?

Entries

1. Letters to my "readers" by Maria @ Once Upon a Story

Our goal with the questions is to reach new places for sharing our reading and literacy experiences and ideas, and we'd love to include your voice, too. Here's how it works ...

1. Select the question(s) that resonates with you.
2. Find an old post or write a new one that answers the question. [Be sure to grab a Share a Story button from the sidebar to include in your new post!]
3. Add your post as a comment.
4. (optional) Tweet about your post and include @ShareaStory or the #SAS-12 hashtag.

We'll be adding links for the questions all week, so there's no rush to have an answer the same day a question is posted ... unless you are entering the contest to receive the RIF 2012 Multicultural Books Collection for your school or public library.

All entries must be posted by Noon Eastern Standard Time, Thursday, 8 March 2012 to be entered in our random drawing. Winners announced Friday, 9 March 2012.

[image credit: Share a Story Logo created by author/illustrator Elizabeth Dulemba.]

Read more...

No Time To Write - Musings of a Children's Book Author, Surgeon & Read Aloud Dad

Jo Ann Kairys interviews her son and co-author Daniel Kairys (pronounced care-ease) about the inspiration for their award-winning book Sunbelievable: Connecting Children with Science and Nature  and how it engages young readers.

Interview with Dan.

Daniel shares his experiences growing up as a young reader in Montana, and how a simple story like Corduroy impacted him and introduced him to "other cultures." Jo Ann shares her memories of Daniel's first dive into reading with The Hobbit. Daniel adds that Chaim Potock was also one of his first real forays into reading.

Both of Daniel's children love to hear him tell stories. Like many busy parents, Daniel doesn't have lots of time to "spare," and Jo Ann asks how he fits reading with his kids into his schedule .... and theirs. Terry also asked Jo Ann a few extra questions.

Terry: Thank you for finding Share a Story, Jo Ann and for sharing such a wonderful interview with your son and co-author. I'm curious. Was Daniel as "into" books then as he is now with his kids?
Jo Ann: You're welcome. I'm glad to be here. It is such a great complement to my new passion: the BRAG project (Bloggers Read Across the Globe).

Daniel was always into books... he loved picture books and started reading before he learned the alphabet because he was so eager to know the actual story on the page. He started sounding out letters by guessing. I helped him with the sounds and then he immediately grew into chapter books. He read The Hobbit on his own in the early part of second grade. Couldn't put it down.

From second through fifth grade, his teachers took him almost daily to the library for a new stack of books. He spent most of his days at the school reading in a corner, loving every minute! He sees similar traits in his children and tries his best to encourage and inspire their reading by engaging them in the experience, sharing impressions of characters in books, talking about their feelings and expressions. They have a lot of fun with reading this way!

Terry: You mentioned the Hobbit, andin your interview, Daniel mentions Chaim Potock. Thinking about the kinds of books he read as a child, and now as a dad, has anything changed?
Jo Ann: He loved me to read aloud from the encyclopedia. When a topic interested Daniel, he'd search for more information during our library visits. A favorite topic at around age 7-8 was WWII--strategy, biography, history, geography. He also loved when I read from the newspaper... especially editorials!

At Dartmouth College he was granted special permission to attend advanced poetry writing classes, with no prior writing experience. I think the sounds of language intrigued him. He received many commendations for his poetry. He's fluent in Spanish and Haitian Creole, and loves reading stories in those languages for himself and with his children who are also trilingual. His love for reading and language started very early, and to this day, he remains a prolific reader.

Terry: Speaking of your grandchildren, and now that they are old enough for their personalities to shine through, what three books would you give them?

Jo Ann
: I would give my granddaughters Little Women, the first "big book" I read as a young girl. Even though the oldest is only eight, I'd give her Romeo and Juliet because of the beautiful language. She's intrigued, just like her Dad, by sounds and nuance and vocabulary. She and her younger sister whose fve, love geography, so I'd give them a world book of maps.

The kids love reading - or being read to - about other countries and cultures. I got them the whole Brain Quest series which they had a lot of fun with. The youngest is just three and seems to somehow just "know" how to read. He enjoys picture books with animals but is more intrigued by trying to figure out instructions on a box of how to put a toy together. I think he'd like How Things Work books.

Terry: Oh, what fun! I wish I could get my daughter interested in Little Women! Thank you for sharing your story about writing and also how you select books for your grandkids. This will be very helpful to parents in trying to find that "just right" book for their kids, too.

_____
Jo Ann founded the 2012 First Annual Bloggers Read Across the Globe (BRAG) Project—Promoting Children’s Reading and Literacy—one enthusiastic blogger at a time. All month long Jo Ann and her guests will be sharing ideas about writing for children and engaging them as readers.

Sunbelievable tells of a hilarious and whacky Sun seen through the emboldened imagination of two young sisters. Does the Sun ride roller coasters? Eat pizza? The story shows the loving relationship and unbounded curiosity of young children.

NASA’s Chief Technologists adds facts about the real Sun as a jumping off point for questions and discussion. The images combine real photographs with magical, digitally created landscapes.

Book title and covers link to Amazon.com with which the Reading Tub has an affiliate relationship.





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Discovering Readers: Share a Story 2012 Day 3

How do you create a reading culture when you don't consider yourself a reader. What does a reader look like?  Do they wear glasses and always have books in their hands? Do they always have their nose in some book and never seem to hear you?

Terry Doherty and her guests will be answering those questions!  At the Family Bookshelf and here on the Share a Story blog, you'll find suggestions on ways to engage readers-to-be, recognize a reader, and maybe even discover that you're already a reader!


Books and the Fourth Grader: Discovering a Reader by Terry Doherty @ Family Bookshelf
Like many of her peers, the fourth grader in Terry's house eked out her required 20 minutes of reading. She finished her homework, but her parents wondered if she would ever really like books and reading. When would the just-get-by behavior end? Continue reading ...

No Time To Write - Musings of a Children's Book Author, Surgeon and Read Aloud Dad by Jo Ann Kairys @ Share a Story - Shape a Future
In this 20-minute interview, award-winning author/illustrator Jo Ann Kairys and her son talk about his life as a writer and reader, both growing up and now as an adult. “I especially love working with my son Daniel, co-author, humanitarian surgeon and avid read-aloud dad."

Do you have a story about discovering a reader? Share it in the comments below and I'll pull it into our post.

Read more...

Tuesday, March 6, 2012

Share a Story 2012: Writing @ Reading - Day 2

So did you have fun yesterday?

Donalyn Miller, her guests, and contributors set the bar P-R-R-I-I-T-T-E-E high talking about creating a reading culture at home and school. We got a few nibbles on our first set of Writing @ Reading prompts, too.


With our focus today on reading as a passport to other worlds, we have selected prompts that help all of us "read widely."
  • An acquaintance wants a book about a culture unlike his/her own ... You've got 100 words to pitch your favorite book. Pitch us!
  • Are there cultural traditions from other parts of the world that you learned about through reading that you've incorporated into your own family traditions? 
  • Similarly, was there something you read in a book that prompted you to learn more about a particular person, place, time beyond your own personal "here and now"?
ENTRIES 
1. Pitch: This is the Way We Go to School by Edith Baer by Northern Virginia Library Mom @ Once Upon a Story

2. Fire on the Mountain by Jane Kurtz - Inspiring us to Make Ethiopian Food by @ Happy Birthday Author

3. The Pitch for Paddington the Bear by Christine Yannou of Book Life Style (posted in comments below)

4. Pitch: Capoeira by George Ancona by Kerry Aradhya @ Picture Books and Pirouettes
____
Our goal with the questions is to reach new places for sharing our reading and literacy experiences and ideas, and we'd love to include your voice, too. Here's how it works ...

1. Select the question(s) that resonates with you.
2. Find an old post or write a new one that answers the question. [Be sure to grab a Share a Story button from the sidebar to include in your new post!]
3. Add your post as a comment.
4. (optional) Tweet about your post and include @ShareaStory or the #SAS-12 hashtag.

We'll be adding links for the questions all week, so there's no rush to have an answer the same day a question is posted ... unless you are entering the contest to receive the RIF 2012 Multicultural Books Collection for your school or public library.

All entries must be posted by Noon, Thursday, 8 March 2012 to be entered in our random drawing. Winners announced Friday, 9 March 2012.

[image credit: Share a Story Logo created by author/illustrator Elizabeth Dulemba.]

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Reading: A Passport to Other Worlds

Real, imagined, literal, or figurative, reading can take you places and offer experiences unlike any other activity. So jump on your magic carpet, hop into your spaceship ... or just sit back and enjoy the journey. Today, Carol Rasco and friends will be taking us around the world and back again!

From Books to Passports: Exploring Children's Literature @ Rasco from RIF
Just call this Bonus Tuesday. Carol has two posts for you. The first one, The Book as Passport, she talks about the importance of diverse reading and introducing kids to new places, cultures, and ideas. Blogs to Explore is a blog tour within a blog tour. "[These are places that] have earlier postings that would be invaluable and have chosen to point those out to you in lieu of new posts written solely for today. Enjoy, but even more benefit from them!"

Here are the blogs Carol includes in her primer.

  • Reading In Color is curated by MissA, a high school senior. Carol particularly likes her POC, Reading & Me page.
  • The Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program (APAP) curates BookDragon, an education, outreach, and research initiative that features literary works which highlight the contributions of Asian and Pacific Islander Americans to the American experience and world cultures.
  • Paper Tigers is a blog and website for the Pacific Rim Voices Project. Nine "voices" share "multicultural books for young readers, world literacy and more…”
  • At Mitali's Fire Escape, award-winning author Mitali Perkins "helps all of us to maintain a strong sense of the importance of children and youth having access to a wide array of literature genuinely representative of all cultures and viewpoints." Subscribe to the blog, but if you're short on time at the moment, watch Mitali's video, Why Our Children Must Read Far and Wide.
  • New York Times best-selling author Cynthia Leitich Smith hosts a children's section on her blog, Cynsations. "She offers a unique approach that children relate to. [It helps them] understand culture is not always about things in the past and things that are 'now' but there can be crossover."
  • American Indians in Children’s Literature (AICL), curated by Debbie Reese, provides “critical perspectives and analysis of indigenous peoples in children’s and young adult books, the school curriculum, popular culture, and society.”
  • The National Latino Children’s Institute (NLCI) is not a blog per se, but it is a site with a wealth of information for those interested in Latino culture and traditions.
  • Our friend Susan Stephenson created The Book Chook, a go-to blog for anyone interested in creative literacy, engaging readers, and books! "There are many things of note on the blog; personally I love the Book Chook Bag of Tricks, a real winner and something all parents, all teachers need to constantly replenish!"

Read Around the World: Getting Started by Amy Broadmoore @ Delightful Children's Books

Not sure where to start with choosing books about other cultures? Then you'll want to visit Amy.  She is an expert at building and/or expanding diversity in your reading repertoire. "For teachers, librarians, and parents interested in adding diversity to their reading repertoire, here are 17 books set in countries around the world with big kid appeal. Continue reading ... 

World Literature that High School Students Actually Want to Read by Sarah Mulhern @ The Reading Zone
I teach World Literature and I love the responsibility of introducing my students to literature from across time and across the world.  Along with the canon literature that I am required to cover, I try to bring in as much multicultural YA as I can, through booktalks, book trailers, displays, and read-alouds. Over the past year I have been compiling a list of books that have caught the attention of my students and I am excited to share them today. Continue  reading ...

Reading the World, One Book at a Time by Beth Stilborn @ By Word of Beth
As she was reading the intro to Carol's posts about Blogs to Explore, one post came to mind instantly for Beth:  Paper Tigers. She talks about participating in the Reading the World” challenge, and offers some ideas on ways to using it as the basis of a family or classroom project. Continue reading ...

Nick's Picks: Listen to Multicultural Book Award-Winning Authors by Nick Glass & Carin Bringelson, TeachingBooks.net for Curriculum Connections--School Library Journal March 6, 2012
Terry spotted this one in an email. It is such a perfect complement to today's theme that she just had to pop it in here!

International Mindedness Series by Debbie Alvarez @ The Styling Librarian
In a three-part series of posts, Debbie shares not only reading and discussion ideas, but websites and additional resources for expanding a person's world through children's literature.


 We'd love to have your ideas and suggestions, too ... just leave a comment here and we'll pop it into the main post.

Read more...

Monday, March 5, 2012

Share a Story 2012: Writing @ Reading - Day 1

Welcome to our daily post with writing prompts!

For those new to Share a Story, for the past several years we have included Writing @ Reading as a way to complement and encourage everyone to participate in this annual blog tour. Each day, we will pose a few questions related to the day's mini-themes. You can write a new post or contribute an old favorite.

By participating in Writing @ Reading, you not only share your wisdome and ideas, but you also bring visitors to your blog. Last but not least, you're also entered in our contest to win a set of the 2012 Multicultural Books Collection for your school or public library. The collection, created and donated by Reading is Fundamental, includes 45 titles ... in celebration of its 45th anniversary.

Today's questions are designed to complement the theme Creating a Reading Culture at Home and School, hosted by Donalyn Miller at The Book Whisperer blog. As you'll see in today's collection of posts, we're not just talking about elementary or dormant readers.
  • Use a Twitter model (i.e., 140 characters) to explain what reading in school was like for you. Ditto reading at home.
  •  When did you realize you were a reader ... was it a book? a teacher? an experience?
  • Image post ... Share a picture of what your ideal / favorite reading space look like.

Entries
1. Our Ideal / Favorite Reading Place by  @ Happy Birthday Author

Our goal with the questions is to reach new places for sharing our reading and literacy experiences and ideas, and we'd love to include your voice, too. Here's how it works ...

1. Select the question(s) that resonates with you.
2. Find an old post or write a new one that answers the question. [Be sure to grab a Share a Story button from the sidebar to include in your new post!]
3. Add your post as a comment.
4. (optional) Tweet about your post and include @ShareaStory or the #SAS-12 hashtag.

We'll be adding links for the questions all week, so there's no rush to have an answer the same day a question is posted ... unless you are entering a book giveaway contest.

[image credit: Share a Story Logo created by author/illustrator Elizabeth Dulemba.]

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Donalyn Miller Opens Share a Story 2012

Welcome to the best Monday in March! We are so glad you are joining us for Share a Story - Shape a Future 2012.

If you're new to our annual blog tour, we invite you to look around. For each of our four years we've picked one over-arching theme for the week. Then, all week long, bloggers gather to share ideas and recommendations on one facet of that theme.

Looking at it as a flower may help. One bloom comprises multiple petals, a stem, and leaves ... all necessary pieces to the beautiful blossom we enjoy.

Okay, let's get on with the show!

Our theme this year is the Culture of Reading, and Donalyn Miller kick-starts our event by talking about Creating a Reading Culture. She and her guests will explain what a "reading culture" is, and offer ways to encourage kids to read more at home and school, as well as across age groups.

Here's what's on tap today ...

Creating a Reading Culture at Home by Donalyn Miller @ The Book Whisperer
Parents often ask teachers and librarians for tips on how to encourage their children to read more at home. The conditions that foster lifelong reading habits in children are remarkably robust and apply to both home and school reading. Continue reading ...

Building a Reading Culture in the Secondary Classroom by Sarah Mulhern @ The Reading Zone
I have an obsession with reading. Some might say that is an unhealthy obsession (my husband is reminding me that our house is a fire hazard), but I disagree. I can’t imagine my life without reading, so I make it my mission to share that love with the students at my high school. Continue reading ...

Reading Culture and Preservice Teachers by Kristin McIlhagga @ Children's Literature Crossroads
As I was getting ready to write this, I decided to reread the Share a Story, Shape a Future website. What stood out to me particularly about the topic of A Reading Culture was the idea of stretching and pushing thinking about the concept beyond an elementary setting. I was excited about this because I’ve been thinking quite a lot about creating a reading culture with the students in my children’s literature and young adult literature course. Continue reading ...

Building a Classroom Reading Culture by Cynthia Alaniz @ Teaching in Cute Shoes
Cynthia has two recent posts that I think you'll love ... and which are both perfect fits for today's mini-theme. In What's My Prize? she shares how her students have taken charge of celebrating their reading accomplishments without smiley-face stickers or reading logs. Her post just before that is titled Would I Want to Learn in My Classroom? and closes with a simple explanation: a classroom is like home to kids.

Offer Choice--Share a Story/ Shape a Future by Doris Herrman @ Reading, Writing, and Chocolate
As a new reading teacher I spent many years trying to help discover the love of the written word. After all, I LOVE to read. If I love to read my students should love to read. It makes sense, doesn't it? Then, reality hit. Continue reading ...

Creating a Reading Culture in Mrs. Selke's Lair by Maria Selke @ Maria's Melange
Life is difficult when you work with students who don’t like to read. How do you coax a dormant reader into full flower? Though that is hard, it can be just as tricky to wrangle voracious readers. Yes, they always have books in their hands, but how can I help them grow? Continue Reading ...

Creating a Reading Culture from a Distance by Beth Stilborn @ By Word of Beth
What about people like me, who have no children of our own, are not librarians or teachers — can we play a role in creating a reading culture? The answer is a resounding YES! I am a writer, so one might say I have a vested interest in making sure kids keep reading, but truthfully that’s not my primary motivation ... What can people like me do, to help get kids reading? Continue reading ...


I will be back several times today to update links as they go live. If you'd like to add a post, be sure to put the link in the comments. I'll pull it into the main post!

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Thursday, March 1, 2012

Welcome March .... Welcome Share a Story


Wow! We are just four days away from kicking off Share a Story ~ Shape a Future 2012 (aka SaS12). What makes this such a great event is that is an ensemble cast of literacy and book-loving passionistas.

This year's theme The Culture of Reading is resonating with everyone ... and we are excited to welcome so many new bloggers to the group.

The blurbs are still rolling in, but here is a quick look at next week's line up. You can also check out our list of contributors to see who has signed up so far!

Mon, 5 Mar: Creating a reading culture
host: Donalyn Miller @ The Book Whisperer

Donalyn and her guests will spend the day talking about ways to create a reading culture at home and at school. We often tend to think of reading cultures in the context of elementary-aged students. Donalyn and her guests are going to help us stretch our minds and embrace the needs of older readers, too. Look for some ideas from The Nerdy Book Clubbers too!


Tue, 6 Mar: Reading as a passport to other worlds / cultures

host: Carol Rasco @ Rasco from RIF

Join RIF President and CEO Carol Rasco and her guests as they explain the importance of diversity in reading, with a look at windows and mirrors and beyond. At The Reading Zone Sarah Gross Mulhern will share world literature suggestions for young adults.

Wed, 7 Mar: Understanding Readers
host: Terry Doherty @ Family Bookshelf

How do you create a reading culture when you don't know what a reader looks like? Terry Doherty and her guests will be answering just that question! The day is filled with suggestions on ways to engage readers-to-be and recognize readers in the most unusual places!

Thu, 8 Mar: A Reading Universe

host: Terry Doherty @ Share a Story
Today we'll look beyond the printed page and explore the new faces of literacy: screens & apps. With the help of Pam Courtney at
LMNOPReads2Kids, we will also celebrate literacy in non-bookish ways.

Fri, 9 Mar: Dear Reader ....
host: Share a Story blog
This year, we're going to try something new for our wrap-up day! We're going to hold an open house and invite anyone who blogs and is passionate about reading and literacy share a story of their own. Stay tuned!

We will continue our Writing @ Reading Contest with prizes offered by Reading is Fundamental and Reading Racehorse

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Credits

Share a Story-Shape a Future Logo created by Elizabeth Dulemba